Day4

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Dr Cawood has guided me around the practice in the noon. Many churches and all from the marvelous big houses to the ordinary house have been seen. The house owned by the CEO of PIZZA HUT is so huge, how much acres is it? And fire department, police station, from elementary to high school are seen in the area of the practice, too. The location for animal hospital could not be more excellent. Otherwise, the number of hospital for human being are not many compared with that in Japan. But some big hospital that do the transplantation has been seen. We can see many church as same as the temple in Japan.

Afternoon he took me to some musical facility at Sweet Water selling the musical instruments, for instance guitar, bass, drums and microphone and training the musical skills. It could be collaborated YAMAHA corporation that has the headquarter in my town.

After that he drove a half hour to the factory of Zimmer corporation. The company guy has guided us to show the procedure of artificial prosthesis on knee and hip for human being. We are so surprised with the facility.

Some Merck Animal Health member, Mrs Cheryl Finch, who is the area manager of Indiana state has gone along us and had the lunch together. Then she guided me to the downtown of Fort Wayne. She is so positive, active and gentle woman, that I appreciate
very much.

Day3

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It’s terribly cold this morning. But the staff of Indian Creek Veterinary Hospital are all fine today. Individuals know what to do very well and collaborate with each other. Of course they all are so kind to me.

In the afternoon, outpatients are increasing. Many clients who request heart worm check are so many even in January. This is because they are likely to receive the prophylaxis of a half year effective shot.
Regarding the procedure for outpatient -first, they give a veterinarian diagnose and explain the needed examination and treatment then the animal is taken to back. Vet techs perform the treatment of ear, nail, skin and anal sac indicated by vets. Registered vet techs and Vets only can take the blood and urine also the injection and the vain securing.
Usual hospitalization and keeping for a half day is similar to Japan. Today was a very busy day.

Day1-Indian Creek Veterinary Hospital IN US

Dr. Kevin Cawood, hospital director, took me to his hospital from my hotel. The first experience could get started in the animal hospital in US.

In the hospital 3vets people,14 vet techs,several receptionist and accountant and good manager is working on individual schedule. The number of staff could be same as my practice but the size of ground and building are much different. It consists of a big parking lot for 30 cars and 3 floor building including the basement.

Regarding facilities, 1st floor is for just medicine, 2nd floor for the staff and the basement for wellness. Other entrance and desk has seen in the opposite side, the place consists trimming, rehab and training facilities, furthermore the radioactive area and MRI can be accessed.

But my most interesting point could be how all of stuff are working. All staff are distinguished to 5 categories, 1:kennel working, 2:receptionist, 3:junior assistant, 4:senior assistant, 5:junior registered vet tech, 6:senior vet tech. And the duty of each category is advocated on the inside wall staff area. They can go up the step then get more salary.

The jobs were well arranged, so doctors do just only diagnosis, surgery and prescription. The registered vet techs and assistants do anesthesia and wait for doctors. The many procedure and schedule list is put up everywhere and seen from everyone.

We need to learn such a managing system so the status and salary of veterinarian could be improved then they could get better work-life balance, furthermore it goes for not only vet people’s happy but also all stuff members.

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Day 2 -The Downs

Only in England would they call hills “downs”. Today we visited the Cholsey practice and drove through the Downs.It was beautiful English countryside with rolling green hills and quaint villages.The practice was located at the end of a country lane outside Cholsey. Despite being hard to find,it was very busy, If you provide excellent service,people will find you. Locklmead Vets staff is well trained to provide excellent service with a smile.20151208_151317

Farewell to Friends

Saturday morning Tim picked me up at 7:45 for the trip to the airport to pick up my wife, Joyce.  She is joining me for a second week of sight seeing in the UK. Her flight was on time and she was relieved to see us waiting as she exited the terminal. After depositing us back at our hotel, Tim continued home to spend some quality time with his family. Joyce and I spent the day exploring Wallingford’s shops and trails. The next day, Joyce and I attended a worship service at his church in Addington, a nearby village.  The church was constructed during the Norman period. Although the temperature was cold, the spirit of friendship warmed everyone there. After the service, Tim treated us to a delicious home cooked meal with his family. It was great to see a family eating together and catching up on each others lives. As in most families, once the meal was over, everyone rushed out to attend to their Christmas activities and Tim dropped Joyce and I off at our hotel. It has been a wonderful week expanding my veterinary knowledge, exploring the historic English villages, and meeting new people. Tomorrow we catch the train to London as we extend our stay to see the sights there.

I would like to thank the people at MSD Animal Health for selecting me to participate in the Nobivac Global Vet Exchange Program and Dr. Hutchinson for being a gracious host.  The experience was rewarding and hopefully many others will be able to have similar experiences. THANKS! !

Day out in Japan

As we all know, a day off from the clinic doesn’t always mean a day off from work.  But today, Dr. Kimata and I decided to get away.  Head out of town, and see some sites.  What a time we had.

Japan has such long standing culture from such early history, it is hard to fathom the extent of knowledge and traditions that these people have passed down from generation to generation.  America is 500 years old.  Our history can be learned in a short course by comparison.  Japanese history remains alive today blended with the modern world in both traditions, and physical structures.  For this reason we headed off from Hamamatsu City to Osaka, and Kyoto by bullet train.

The train system in Japan is like that of New York.  Confusing maps, multiple lines, crowded, fast paced, and only moderate signage that is not friendly to foreigners.  Dr. Kimata navigated our way to tickets, to the platform and off we went to see some history, talk and spend a few hours discussing our practices and how we see them in our views.  With an hour and a half of high speed rail time to kill, Dr. Kimata and I discussed our management practices, opinions and views on the differences we have as societies, and how these become relevant to how we have developed our individual practices.What a great discussion.  I love the management side of practice, and to discuss strategies with another owner about how to survive in today’s internet and high expectation world, I’m all ears.  Come to find out we are no different.  Same issues, same client perception, same pricing structures,  same personnel discussions, same problems, just two different practices half a world apart.  Good to know we can commiserate with vets everywhere.

As we arrive in Osaka, Dr. Kimata and I make our way through the streets and down narrow alleys to finally come to a quick detour we had decided to make on our journey to see the temples and shrines of Kyoto.  This was the Osaka Peppy  Veterinary Nursing College, and the Osaka Veterinary Referral Center.  Wow, what a facility.  As we were given a tour by the Director of the facility and was introduced to the managing doctors, I couldn’t help but notice the underlying tradition of veterinarians and their support of their teaching colleges and how well the work to support each other.  In this case, they are adjacent to each other and students can become exposed to a variety of case load.  Ct, MRI, nuclear and radiation treatments, soft tissue and Orthopedic referral surgery, opthamology, and more.  Up to date equipment that would make any human or veterinary practice jealous, and clean as a whistle. The standard of care here was the utmost importance, and I wouldn’t hesitate to put my animal in their care.

We made our way back to a local train and headed to Kyoto, the temple city, the past capital, and home to the greatest number of temples and shrines of Japan to get a glimpse of the way it used to be.

Amongst the modern city buildings we came upon old structures shouldered on either side, shrines that were still in use by traditional japanese, and show pieces of temples of a bygone era that would make your jaw drop.  Each one designed by masterful architects and built on the backs of the people, they stood for strength, deep religious believe, and power.  Only special and powerful people gained access to the inner sanctums of such holy places, but all were revered as sacred by commoners.  We talked about this nations past, its conquests, its wars, its ups and downs, and its current state of affairs.  We briefly touched on politics and what is happening around the world with terrorism, and we both enjoyed our security and freedom we have in our countries.    We had an incredible day.  We walked, ate lunch, saw amazing temples including the Shogun temple of a hundred warriors, and the Golden Temple, and ended it by shopping in a local market to bring back presents.  A bullet train ride and we were back in Hamamatsu.  I couldn’t have had a more delightful day with a colleague I respect and have come to know as a friend.

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